Physicians Training in Diving Medicine

NEXT COURSE DATE: OCTOBER 16-27, 2017

  • PLEASE NOTE: All interested INTERNATIONAL attendees must register & have the NOAA FOREIGN NATIONAL VISITOR/GUEST INFORMATION FORM filled out an emailed to uhms@uhms.org
    by AUGUST 31, 2017


    Course Description and Goal

    The UHMS/NOAA Physicians Training in Hyperbaric Medicine Course was started in 1977 with financial support from the Department of Energy and the cooperation of the US Navy.  Further influence has been based on internationally accepted training objectives that were agreed upon by the Diving Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC), the European Diving Technology Committee (EDTC), and the European Committee for Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM).  This course is primarily designed for those who possess an M.D., D.O., or equivalent degree; however those non-physicians who will use the training in their geographic areas to enhance the safety and efficiency of diving operations will also find the course of value. 

    The goal of this course is to train physicians in recognizing and treating diving medical emergencies.  Course educational methodology includes lectures, case presentations, video clips, printed support materials, practical exercises, and both formal and informal question and answer sessions with the faculty.                

    In addition to lectures on the physiology and medicine of diving, the course will include practical "hands on" experience operating and working recompression chambers, and the use of commercial and military diving equipment. 

    Applicants for the course should possess an M.D., D.O., or equivalent degree.  Preference will be given to those applicants who will use the training in their geographic areas to enhance the safety and efficiency of diving operations.  

    The applicant must pass a diving physical examination if they wish to participate in diving/pressure related activities.  Please make sure you fill in the 


    OBSERVER DIVER MEDICAL HISTORY FORM - NOAA Form 57-03-53   PDF  - Fax to:  919-490-5149 or email to: uhms@uhms.org 


    Please fill out the FOREIGN NATIONAL VISITOR/GUEST INFORMATION FORMPDF  - Fax to: 919-490-5149 or email to: uhms@uhms.org  


    CME Hours:  For MD/DO/PhD, or equivalent advanced degree, a Certificate of Continuing Medical Education Credits will be issued for those who complete an online evaluation form; MOC credit will be available.  

     

    DIVING GEAR:
    NOAA can provide all diving gear, but if you are a diver, they highly encourage that you bring your own gear. The temperature in the training tank at that time of year is expected to be in the low 60s.

    If you do not have diving gear, NOAA can provided for you.  The link below is their wetsuit sizing sheet, this will need to be filled out in order for them to have a ball-park size for you to try on when you get there.

    NOAA sizing sheet: http://www.omao.noaa.gov/find/media/documents/nf-57-03-65-2-15-sep-measurement-form.

  • HOTEL INFORMATION: 

    Silver Cloud
    5036 25th Ave, NE
    Seattle, WA 98105

    Room Rate: $179 Single King
    **$189 Double Queen - Subject to Availability**

    ASSOCIATED TAXES AND SERVICE CHARGES: Lodging Tax: 15.6% (subject to change without notice)

    ONLINE RESERVATIONS: CLICK HERE
    OR Call our hotel directly at (206) 526-5200 or 1 (800) 205-6940 and ask for the "Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society - UHMS/NOAA Joint Training 10'16" or "UHMSNOAA" group and the guest services agent will be able to assist with the reservation. 
    Reservation Cut-off date: Sunday, September 25; 3pm PT

    Group rates are availability three days pre/post meeting dates, subject to last room availability .

    Please note a $15.00 taxable surcharge is applied for each adult beyond double occupancy. There is a max of (4) four individuals per guestroom, regardless of guestroom type. Children 18 years and under stay free.

    CONCESSIONS:
     Complimentary Hot Breakfast Buffet, served 6:30am to 9:30am Mon-Fri and 7:00am to 10:30am Sat-Sun
     Complimentary Parking Onsite
     Complimentary High Speed Internet Access in guestrooms
     Courtesy Shuttle Service for registered Silver Cloud guests to NOAA facility on Sand Point Way from the hotel every
         morning and from NOAA facility to Hotel each evening according to a mutually agreed schedule (est. 7AM and 7:30 AM
         departures with 5:15 and 5:45 PM return) and within a 3 mile radius for individual guest use based on availability.
     Complimentary use of Hotel’s Fitness Facility and Business Center
     Hotel to provide complimentary (as available to all hotel guests) weekly hosted Managers Reception or (depending upon
        status of hotels expansion/renovation and lobby remodel) provide UHMS with two complimentary drink vouchers per
        registered hotel guest per week which may be utilized at attendees discretion or applied to a specific nights’ UHMS get
        together.
     Complimentary microwaves and refrigerators in every guest room, 



    TRAVEL/TRANSPORTATION

    AIRPORT: Seattle –Tacoma International Airport: Code: SEA

    Attendees will be responsible for getting to the hotel from the airport and vice versa.  Ground transportation information: http://www.portseattle.org/Sea-Tac/Parking-and-Transportation/Ground-Transportation/Pages/Bus-Shuttle-Courtesy.aspx  

    NOTE: Transportation to the NOAA Center for the class will be provided.  .

    SEATTLE TACOMA INTERNATIONAL (SEA) AIRPORT

    • Approximate driving time is 33 minutes and distance is 19 miles
    • Amtrak Train Station – 6 miles
    • Greyhound Bus Station – 4 miles

    UNIVERSITY LINK LIGHT RAIL STATION (NOW OPEN!)

    • Located one mile from the hotel
    • Direct link to Downtown Seattle & Seattle – Tacoma International Airport
    • Courtesy hotel shuttle for up to 14 passengers & luggage available 7:00am – 10:00pm
    • For shuttle pick-up, contact the hotel at 206.526.5200 upon arrival at the station

     

  • CLICK HERE

    Please click the above link to register or use the WORD or PDF registration forms (links below) and email or fax to us.  
    Click here for the WORD version.     Click here for the PDF version.   Thank you.

    FEES: 

    COURSE REGISTRATION:

  • Course Schedule: as of 2/23/2017 (subject to change)

    Monday, October 16 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 0900

    Welcome, Introduction to NOAA & UHMS

    Dulaigh/McFall/Holm

       
    • Restate the goal of the course and apply instructions for use of the course syllabus;
    • Recognize course officials, faculty, and UHMS and NOAA support staff;
    • Demonstrate an understanding of course procedures through attention during lectures and participation with questions to the faculty.
     
     

    0900 – 1100

    Introduction to Diving

    Dulaigh

       
    • Describer the location and general characteristics of the NOAA Dive Center (NDC), and the Dive Center’s position within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA);
    • Explain the mission of the NOAA Dive Center;
    • Discuss the types of professionals/individuals who participate in the NDC through training, certification and equipping;
    • Describe how the NOAA Dive Program impacts diving technology, instruction, safety and innovation
     
     

    1100 – 1200

    Diving & Hyperbaric Physics: Part 1-Pressure

    Dinsmore

       
    • Define atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure and describe early attempts to prove their existence;
    • Calculate absolute and gauge pressures for any depth of fresh or seawater and express results in atmospheres, feet of water, or pounds per square inch.
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1500

    Diving & Hyperbaric Physics: Part 2 – Gas Laws

    Dinsmore

       
    • Paraphrase Boyle’s, Charles’, Gay-Lussac’s, Dalton’s, and Henry’s Gas Laws and describe how each affects the human body during hyperbaric exposures;
    • Calculate partial pressures, pressure-volume and pressure temperature changes at depth;
    • Convert between imperial, metric and other units of pressure, and the different temperature units.
     
     

    1500 – 1600

    Orientation to NOAA Diving Center and Chambers

    NDC Staff

           

      

    1600 – 1700

    Diving Equipment “Hands-on” (Bldg. 8)

    Gordon (?)

       
    • Define surface-supplied diving;
    • List the advantages and disadvantages of surface-supplied diving;
    • Be more informed about the misconceptions of the surface-supplied diving mode;
    • Identify and explain the purpose of each component involved in a surface-supplied diving system;
    • Describe the various diving and topside-support procedures involved in conducting a surface-supplied dive.
     

    Tuesday, October 17 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 0930

    No Decompression Tables

    Dinsmore

       
    • State the origin of the NOAA No-Decompression Table for Multiple Air Dives;
    • Define the terms depth, actual bottom time, decompression, nodecompression limits, decompression schedule, single dive, surface interval time, residual nitrogen, repetitive dive, repetitive group designation, residual nitrogen time, and equivalent single dive time;
    • Describe the various phases of a no-decompression dive, including descent, on-bottom and ascent, and state the maximum rate of ascent and descent for U.S. Navy Dive Tables;
      *Explain when the NOAA No-Decompression Table for Multiple Air Dives would be used instead of U.S. Navy Dive Table 9-9;
    • Explain the purpose of Chart’s 1, 2, and 3 on the NOAA NoDecompression Table for Multiple Air Dives;
    • Determine the repetitive group designation and maximum nodecompression limits for single and repetitive dives using the NOAA No-Decompression Table for Multiple Air Dives and the U.S. Navy  Dive Table 2A-1 and 2A-2;
    • Determine minimum surface interval between repetitive dives;
    • Diagram and label single and repetitive no-decompression dive profiles;
    • State the procedure to be followed when the surface interval between dives is less than 10 minutes;
    • Compare and contrast the NOAA No-Decompression Table for Multiple Air Dives and the U.S. Navy Dive Table 2A-1 and 2A-2
     
     

    0930 – 1200

    Diving Related Physiology & Pathophysiology of Immersion

    Pollock

       
    • Immersion
    • Breath-hold practices
    • Breathing bases used for diving
    • Sound and sound energy
    • Diver physical fitness
    • Post-dive altitude exposure
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1400

    Decompression Tables and Procedures

    Dinsmore

     
    • Explain when to use U.S. Navy Dive Table 9-9 instead of NOAA No-Decompression Table for Multiple Air Dives;
    • Describe the various phases of a decompression dive including descent, on-bottom, ascent/decompression;
    • Compare and contrast the three methods for decompression listed in U.S. Navy Dive Table 9-9;
    • Calculate the decompression times and repetitive group designations for single and repetitive decompression dives;
    • Describe the procedures for ascent rate variations;
    • Determine minimum surface interval required before traveling to altitude following a hyperbaric exposure.
    • Explain the operational considerations for reverse dive profiles;
    • Define a safety stop, state when a safety stop is recommended, and describe safety stop procedures;
     
     

    1400 – 1500

    Surface Oxygen Administration

    Jeremiah

       
    • Review signs when surface oxygen needs to be administered;
    • Discuss the procedure for oxygen administration;
    • Identify all parts of oxygen administration equipment and assembly the parts for use;
    • Inspect and detail equipment to ensure working order;
    • Demonstrate ability to assemble, administer, and plan oxygen program.
     

     

    1500 – 1700

    Thermal Considerations

    Pollock

       
    • Describe major avenues of heat exchange
    • Describe thermoregulatory control
    • Compare effects of dry and immersed thermal challenges
    • Define and contrast wind chill and heat index measures
    • Discuss strategies to minimize thermal stress
    • Define hypothermia and discuss rewarming strategies
    • Recognize the common presentation of heat injuries
    • Contrast the effectiveness of heat and cold adaptation
     

    Wednesday, October 18 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 0900

    The Neurologic Exam

    Dulaigh/Holm

       
    • List the 5 areas of consideration when performing a neurological assessment;
    • Describe steps for determining mental status;
    • Discuss the indicators of muscle strength and general coordination, and describe 5 assessment tests;
    • Describer the symptoms involving the motor system including tests to determine extremity strength;
    • Review the 12 cranial nerves and describe an assessment test for each;
    • Perform assessment tests;
    • Discuss sensory function and instruments for testing changes in sensation;
    • Describe the purpose of deep tendon reflexes including the patient response classification.
     

     

    0900 – 1100

    Non-Decompression Gas Physiology

    Pollock

       
    • use, recommended limits, and toxic effects of oxygen
    • issues, mitigation and monitoring of carbon dioxide
    • nitrogen narcosis
    • high pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS)
     
     

    1100 – 1200

    Dive Computers

    Jeremiah

       
    • List two types of decompression algorithms used by diving computers;
    • List the major components to diving computers;
    • Describe the major benefit of using diving computers;
    • Discuss the differences in commonly used diving computers;
    • Describe the major limitations to diving computers.
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     

    1300 – 1400

    Introduction to PVHO, Chamber Safety, Risk Assessment

    Hileman

     
    • Define and describe a PVHO;
    • List types of PVHOs;
    • Review requirements for design and aspects for inspection.
     
     

    1400 – 1700

    Chamber Operations

     
       

    60” Chamber – Neuro exams under pressure

    NDC Staff

       

    80” Chamber – 165’ chamber dive

    NDC Staff

     

    • Identify the following components on a multi-person, multi-lock recompression chamber: air inlet and exhaust valves, depth gauges, pressure gauges, viewports, oxygen and air BIBS masks, inner and outer locks, medical transfer lock, communication system, oxygen systems, record keeping log, time keeping devices, lighting system, firefighting system, back-pressure regulators, and pressure – relief valves;
    • Identify the following components used in the support of hyperbaric chamber operations: high and low-pressure air compressors, filtration systems, and air drier, and high and low-pressure air storage systems;
    • Serve in the following roles during a simulated hyperbaric chamber run: operator, timekeeper, and communications operator, diving medical officer, inside tender, patient;
    • Pressurize and de-pressurize, and ventilate a hyperbaric chamber at the correct rate;
    • Perform patient examinations (neuro) under pressure in a hyperbaric chamber;
    • Participate in planned chamber exposures and experience the effects of pressure on the human body;
    • List and describe the procedures involved with pressure chamber exposures

     

    Thursday, October 19 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 1000

    Acute Dysbaric Disorders

    Freiberger

       
    • Define DCI (cases as examples);
    • Review the proposed mechanisms of DCS and AGE;
    • Describe the epidemiology of DCS and AGE;
    • Describe the diagnosis of decompression sickness;
    • Review the UHMS Best Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Decompression Sickness and Arterial Gas Embolism;
    • Review the treatment of DCI.
     

      

    1000 – 1200

    Chronic Dysbaric Disorders/Long Term Effects

    Freiberger

       
    • Discuss data on ear LTHE from recreational/sport, military and commercial divers;
    • Cite pulmonary LTHE effects on commercial divers;
    • Define dysbaric osteonecrosis (DON);
    • Discuss the classification of DON and causes and likely subjects;
    • Discuss the differential diagnosis of osteonecrosis;
    • Review neurological data from breath-hold, commercial, recreational and military divers;
    • Discuss neuropsychiatric LTHE data on commercial divers.
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1430

    Diving as an Occupation

    Freiberger

       
    • Introduction to commercial diving
    • Principles of occupational medicine
    • Training
    • Environmental issues
    • Occupational injuries
    • Rehabilitation of injured divers
    • Health risk assessments
     
     

    1430 – 1530

    Complications of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    Holm

       
    • Definition of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
    • Accepted Indications for HBO2
    • Mechanisms of Action of HBO2
    • Contraindications of HBO2
    • Side Effects of  HBO2
     
     

    1530 – 1700

    Surface Supplied Pre-Dive Briefing/Orientation (Bldg. 8)

    Gordon

       
    • Identify the following surface-supplied diving components and hardware; DSI Superlite-17 helmet, bailout system, safety harness, weighting system, umbilical, communication system, and air manifold;
    • Identify the following components used in the support of surface supplied diving operations: high and low pressure air compressors, filtration systems, air drier, high and low pressure air storage systems;
    • Serve in the following roles during training dives in the NDC tower; diver, tender, communications, and standby diver;
    • Gain experience in surface-supplied diving operations by performing a surface-supplied orientation dive to 30 fsw in the NDC training tower
     

    Friday, October 20 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 8)

     

    0800 – 1200

    Superlite 17 Surface Supplied Divers (Group A)

    Gordon

       

    Chamber Narcosis Exposure (Group B)

    Wells/NOAA Staff

       

    Life Support in Closed Circuit and Saturation Diving Systems

     
     

    Simulated Close Circuit Saturation Dive to 100'

     
     
    • Identify the following surface-supplied diving components and hardware; DSI Superlite-17 helmet, bailout system, safety harness, weighting system, umbilical, communication system, and air manifold;
    • Identify the following components used in the support of surface supplied diving operations: high and low pressure air compressors, filtration systems, air drier, high and low pressure air storage systems;
    • Serve in the following roles during training dives in the NDC tower; diver, tender, communications, and standby diver;
    • Gain experience in surface-supplied diving operations by performing a surface-supplied orientation dive to 30 fsw in the NDC training tower;
    • Witness a dive to 120 fsw while adjusting breathing medium to 0.35 bar oxygen;
    • Gain understanding of the effect of pressure on partial pressures of gasses;
    • Observe and discuss the difference between percentage and partial pressure of a gas as witnessed in the chamber during the dive;
    • Calculate the partial pressure of all gases in the breathing medium at a given pressure and percentage of gas mixture.
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1700

    Superlite 17 Surface Supplied Divers (Group B)

    Gordon

       

    Chamber Narcosis Exposure (Group A)

    Wells/NOAA Staff

       

    Life Support in Closed Circuit and Saturation Diving Systems

     
     

    Simulated Close Circuit Saturation Dive to 100'

     
     
    • Identify the following surface-supplied diving components and hardware; DSI Superlite-17 helmet, bailout system, safety harness, weighting system, umbilical, communication system, and air manifold;
    • Identify the following components used in the support of surface supplied diving operations: high and low pressure air compressors, filtration systems, air drier, high and low pressure air storage systems;
    • Serve in the following roles during training dives in the NDC tower; diver, tender, communications, and standby diver;
    • Gain experience in surface-supplied diving operations by performing a surface-supplied orientation dive to 30 fsw in the NDC training tower;
    • Witness a dive to 120 fsw while adjusting breathing medium to 0.35 bar oxygen;
    • Gain understanding of the effect of pressure on partial pressures of gasses;
    • Observe and discuss the difference between percentage and partial pressure of a gas as witnessed in the chamber during the dive;
    • Calculate the partial pressure of all gases in the breathing medium at a given pressure and percentage of gas mixture.
     

    Saturday, October 21 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4) and VM:

     

    0800 – 0900

    Fitness to Dive Assessment and Standards

    Mitchell

       
    • Describe the proscriptive and discretionary approaches to diving medical evaluations, and their respective advantages or disadvantages
    • Describe commonly used administrative models for diving medical evaluations
    • Describe a functional analysis of diving
    • Apply a “3 question” generic framework for evaluating the impact of any medical condition in diving
     
     

    0900 – 1100

    Pathophysiology and Manifestations of Decompression Illness

    Mitchell

       
    • Explain the terminology of dysbaric disease
    • Describe the cause and symptoms of cerebral arterial gas embolism
    • Describe the factors influencing the uptake and elimination of inert gas in body tissues and the concept of inert gas supersaturation
    • Describe where bubbles form and how they may distribute in the body
    • List the target organs for bubble injury in DCS and explain current concepts of the mechanisms and manifestations of such injury
     
     

    1100 – 1200

    Evaluation, Interventions and Evacuation of Diving Injuries

    Mitchell

       
    • Early management of DCI in the field
    • DCI first aid
    • Positioning
    • Oxygen
    • Fluids
    • Reporting and triage
    • Evacuation
    • Effect of delay to recompression
    • Mild DCI
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1400

    Case Discussion: Diagnosis & Early Management

    Holm/Mitchell

     
    •  Identify the prehospital evaluation and treatment of each case presented
    • Discuss the transport options or each case
    • List useful adjunctions that should be used prior to recompression in these cases
     
     

    1400 – 1500

    Clinical Hyperbaric Chambers

    Holm

       
    • Definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy
    • NFPA classes of chambers
    • Monoplace chambers
    • Multiplace chambers
    • Critical care in chambers
    • Chamber safety and regulation issues
     

     

    1630

    Pick-up from hotel for Tour & Banquet

     

     

    1700 – 1800

    Virginia Mason Hyperbaric Chamber Tour

    Holm

       
    • Identify and explain the various sections of a hyperbaric chamber and the support equipment used in hyperbaric treatments;
    • Describe the constraints of using various items of medical, diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic equipment
     
     

    1800 – 2030

    Reception, Buffet and Guest Lecture (near VM)

    Dulaigh/Holm/Mitchell

    Sunday, October 22 – Day off to enjoy Seattle

    Monday, October 23 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 1000

    Recompression Therapy and Adjunctive Therapies for Decompression Illness

    Mitchell

       
    • Rationale for recompression
    • Initial recompression
    • Adjuvants to HBO
    • Intensive care patients
    • Follow up recompression
    • Care between recompressions
    • Advice at discharge
     
     

    1000 – 1100

    Non-Pulmonary Barotrauma (Ears)

    Tomaszewski

       
    • Most common outer and inner ear disorders associated with diving,
    • How to prevent this issues
    • How to diagnosis and treat them.
     
     

    1100 – 1200

    Medications Under Pressure

    Tomaszewski

       
    • Epidemiology of medication use among divers
    • Potential adverse effects of medications on diving
    • Recommendations regarding medications and diving
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1400

    Return to Diving after Decompression Illness

    Mitchell

     
    • Identify the prehospital evaluation and treatment of each case presented
    • Discuss the transport options or each case
    • List useful adjunctions that should be used prior to recompression in these cases
     
     

    1400 – 1500

    Case Discussion: Recompression Management

    Mitchell/Holm/Tomaszewski

       
    • Discuss actual cases reported from faculty’s files to include, preliminary signs and symptoms, assessment tests performed, and make a recommendation on treatment;
    • Give an assessment of accident situations and make recommendation for management;
    • Review subsequent symptoms which have not resolved;
    • Review results of further examination and provide an assessment for further management;
    • Provide recommendations for further fitness to dive.
     
     

    1500 – 1700

    Hazardous Marine Life and Marine Toxins

    Tomaszewski

       
    • Review the most common marine envenomations and treatment
    • Stings
    • Wounds
    • Infections
    • List toxic ingestions unique to the marine environment
     

    Tuesday, October 24 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 0900

    HBO2 Basic Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Holm

       
    • Define hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Explain the three fundamental mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Describe absolute and relative contraindications for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the possible side effects for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the types of hyperbaric chambers used for clinical indications
     
     

    0900 – 1100

    Clinical Hyperbaric Indications, Part 1

    Holm

       
    • Define hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Explain the three fundamental mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Describe absolute and relative contraindications for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the possible side effects for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the types of hyperbaric chambers used for clinical indications.
     
     

    1100 – 1200

    Hyperbaric Tunneling

    Kay

       
    • Discuss emergencies that could be encountered in a hyperbaric tunnel and describe the emergency procedures that could be employed to reduce significant injury and loss of life;
    • Describe the essential differences between working in water and working in compressed air;
    • Define dysbaric osteonecrosis and explain its origin, significant effects, delay in symptoms, differential diagnosis, treatment, and prevention;
    • Review the decompression procedures used in tunneling, including surface decompression and discuss the differences from tables used by divers;
    • Explain UPTD and why it is important in tunnel work
    • State the major symptom groups that comprise acute CNS oxygen toxicity;
    • Explain the procedures necessary to file a variance. Discuss why variances are necessary and the state the documentation required for submission of a variance;
    • List the responsibilities for a project physician in a deep hyperbaric tunnel
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 - 1700

    Station Rotation (Bldg. 8)

     
       

        Emergency Evacuation Hyperbaric Stretcher (Hyperlite)

    Hileman

     

    60” chamber

    NDC Staff

     

        80” chamber

    NDC Staff

     

        Spirometry

    Dulaigh

     
    • Gain hands on experience with the Hyperlite Emergency Evacuation Hyperbaric Stretcher (EEHS) by setting up, pressurizing and depressurizing the Hyperlite EEHS;
    • Participate on a stationary cycle while hooked to a spirometer;
    • Analyze results of the cycling and discuss impacts on diving.
     

    Wednesday, October 25 – At DIT (am); At NOAA Diving Center (pm)
    (Rental Shuttle AM / HOTEL Shuttle PM)

     

    0800 – 1200

    Divers Institute of Technology (DIT)

    Johnston and DIT Staff

       

    Diving Demonstration, Diving Procedures

     
       

    Saturation Diving, Basic Safety Planning

     
       

    Commercial Regulations and Standards

     

    • Define: surface supplied air diving, surface supplied mixed-gas (helium/oxygen mix) diving, saturation diving, including depth/maximum depth;
    • Describe the educational process and curriculum of the “making of a commercial diver”;
    • Discuss diver certification and the related contractors associations;
    • List and discuss commercial dive equipment to include helmets, suits and harnesses - advantages and disadvantages;
    • Describe types of decompression chambers used with commercial diving;
    • Describe a commercial diving yard to include equipment and chambers used, and, actual simulation of underwater commercial operations
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 – 1400

    Hyperbaric Treatment Tables

    Holm

     
    • List three goals of recompression therapy;
    • List two types of air recompression tables used by the US Navy;
    • List the most common oxygen recompression tables used by the US Navy;
    • Describe a US Navy Treatment Table 6 and the use of “extensions”;
    • Describe the protocol for determining the number/duration of hyperbaric treatments in treating DCS.
     
     

    1400 – 1600

    Clinical Hyperbaric Indications, Part 2

    Huang

       
    • Define hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Explain the three fundamental mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen therapy;
    • Describe absolute and relative contraindications for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the possible side effects for HBO2 therapy;
    • Describe the types of hyperbaric chambers used for clinical indications.
     
     

    1600 – 1700

    Clinical Cases and Discussion

    Holm/Huang

       
    •  Identify important historical information to obtain from the patient
    • Identify key decision making points in the treatment of the patient
    • Apply gained knowledge to clinical case upon return home
     

    Thursday, October 26 – At NOAA Diving Center (Bldg. 4)

     

    0800 – 0900

    Diver Risks and Fatalities

    Caruso

       
    • Discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of diving related deaths.
    • Explain the importance of natural disease processes, particularly cardiovascular disease, to diving related deaths.
    • Cite the most common risk factors associated with diving related deaths.
    • Discuss the major causes of death and contributing factors seen in diving related deaths.
    • Describe the risks involved with breathing compressed gas at depth and the relative risks to other types of activities.
     
     

    0900 – 1000

    Diver Accident Investigation

    Caruso

       
    • List the key members of a diving fatality investigation team and their responsibilities;
    • Discuss the importance of a well performed autopsy to the investigation of a diving related death;
    • Discuss the need for an unbiased equipment evaluation and discuss the limitations of the results;
    • Describe the value of knowing the injured diver’s medical history, dive training and experience, and familiarity with the dive site and the equipment used;
    • Interpret the dive profile and eyewitness accounts relative to the risks for various outcomes (e.g., air embolism, decompression sickness, drowning, natural disease)
     
     

    1000 – 1200

    Case Histories of Diving Incidents and Accidents

    Caruso

       
    • Distinguish the most likely cause of death when provided the details of a fatal diving related mishap;
    • Summarize common postmortem artifacts present on the postmortem examination of someone who died while on a dive or shortly after completing a dive.
     
     

    1200 – 1300

    Lunch

     
     

    1300 - 1700

    Station Rotation (Bldg. 8)

     
       

        Emergency Evacuation Hyperbaric Stretcher (Hyperlite)

    Hileman

     

    60” chamber

    NDC Staff

     

        80” chamber

    NDC Staff

       

        Spirometry

    Dulaigh

     

    • Gain hands on experience with the Hyperlite Emergency Evacuation Hyperbaric Stretcher (EEHS) by setting up, pressurizing and depressurizing the Hyperlite EEHS;
    • Participate on a stationary cycle while hooked to a spirometer;
    • Analyze results of the cycling and discuss impacts on diving.
     

    Friday, October 27 – At Silver Cloud Hotel

     

    0800 – 1100

    Examination and Review

     
       
    • Demonstrate knowledge gained from the course by testing through written examination.
     

     

    1100 – 1200

    Evaluation/Graduation/Closure

    Dulaigh/Holm

     

     


    Accreditation and Approval

    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the ACCME.

    The Diving Medical Advisory Committee and the European Diving Technical Committee (DMAC/EDTCmed has approved this course at Level IIA - Diving Medicine Physician.

    Credit Designation

    The UHMS designates this live activity for a maximum of 83 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    MOC credit will also be available from the American Board of Preventive Medicine.

    Disclosure

    All faculty members and planners participating in continuing medical education activities sponsored by UHMS are expected to disclose to the participants any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests.  Full disclosure of faculty and planner relevant financial relationship will be made at the activity.