PRE-COURSES


Wednesday, June 26, 2019

  • How to Prepare for Accreditationregister now button

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26: 8am-5pm
    Program Chair: Derall Garrett, CHT


    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the UHMS Clinical Hyperbaric Facility Accreditation Program, its structure, survey processes and "insider tips” on preparing to undergo an accreditation survey. Experienced surveyor faculty members will provide a comprehensive overview of the process to streamline preparation.

    SCHEDULE:
    subject to change
    posted: 4/19/2018

    TIME

       

    0800-0815

    Welcome/Introductions                                                      

    Garrett

    0815-1015

    Why Accredit Clinical Hyperbaric Facilities?       

    Garrett

    1015-1045

    Break

     

    1045-1145

    Hyperbaric Facility Accreditation Program Design I  & II

    Garrett

    1145-1245

    Lunch

    On Own

    1245-1330

    Physician point of view                                                   

    Schwartz

    1330-1415

    Nurse point of view

    Bello

    1415-1500

    Technologist point of view                                                     

    Mize

    1500-1515

    Break

     

    1515-1545

    Organizational Planning                                            

    Workman

    1545-1600

    Discussion/Questions

     

    1600

    Adjourn

     

     


    CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS:

    Accreditation Statement:  
    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Designation Statements: 
    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society designates this live activity for a maximum of TBA AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Nursing CEU is approved by the Florida Board of Registered Nursing Provider #50-10881. ASM Credit hours 6.25.

    Licenses Types Approved:

    • Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner
    • Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Licensed Practical Nurse
    • Registered Nurse
    • Certified Nursing Assistant
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Critical Care
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Non-Critical Care
    • Registered Respiratory Therapist
    • Certified Respiratory Therapist

    NBDHMT: This live activity is approved for 6.25 Category A credit hours by National Board of Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Technology, 9 Medical Park, Suite 330, Columbia, South Carolina 29203.

    MOC ABPM: This activity has been approved by the American Board of Preventive Medicine for up to TBA MOC credits. Claiming ABPM MOC credit is appropriate for those who are ABPM diplomates.”

    Full Disclosure Statement:
     All faculty members and planners participating in continuing medical education activities sponsored by Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society are expected to disclose to the participants any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. Full disclosure of faculty and planner relevant financial relationships will be made at the activity.

    Disclaimer: The information provided at this CME activity is for Continuing Medical Education purposes only.  The lecture content, statements or opinions expressed however, do not necessarily represent those of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society
    (UHMS), its affiliates or its employees.

     

  • register now button

    Hyperbaric Oxygen Safety: Clinical and Technical Issues
    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26: 8am-5:30pm

    Hear from the foremost medical and technical leaders in hyperbaric safety as we discuss past and present safety considerations. This event is suitable for all disciplines, as we blend the experience of physicians, nurses, and technical staff to formulate a unique safety course to suit your needs.

    The purpose of this course is to provide current information related to the clinical and technical safety of clinical hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This course is organized by both regular and associate members. The sessions will be of special interest to clinicians and technical staff and is provided in response to requests from the membership for a pre-course related to safety aspects of clinical hyperbaric oxygen therapy. MOC/CME and CEU credits will be available for this course.


    SCHEDULE 
    Subject to change: posted: 2/26/19

    TIME   LECTURE FACULTY
    0800 - 0815                                Introductions: / Welcome  Marc Robins, DO
    Andrew Melnyczenko, CHT
    0815 - 0915 Safety considerations in hyperbaric medicine: Lessons from aviation, space, and other industries Gary Toups, MD
    0915 - 1015 The role of the medical director in the safety program Marc Robins, DO
    1015 - 1030 Break  
    1030 - 1050 How to implement the nursing guidelines of care to improve safety in your HBO program Annette Gwilliam, RN, BSN, CWON, CWS, ACHRN
    1050 - 1110

    Human factors that impact safety in hyperbaric operations

    Richard “Gus” Gustavson, MPH, RN, CHRNC-A, CWCN, CHT-A, CRT
    1110 - 1130 Optimizing the pediatric hyperbaric oxygen therapy plan: Tandem therapy Nicholas Marosek, RN, CHRN
    1130 - 1200 Panel Q&A from the morning session  Moderator:
    Andrew Melnyczenko, CHT
    1200 - 1300  Lunch   
    1300 - 1345 Safety-related trends revealed from the UHMS Facility Accreditation Program Tom Workman, CHT
    1345 - 1430 Assessing the safety of diver recompression chamber facilities. A retrospective review of the most common safety concerns encountered at a range of recompression facilities over a period of 13 years Francois Burman
    1430 - 1445 Break  
    1445 - 1530 Safety versus Compliance  Kip Posey, CHT
    1530 - 1600 International survey of equipment used in hyperbaric facilities Marc Pullis, EMT, CHT
    1600 - 1645 Biomedical devices in the hyperbaric environment Ian Millar, MD
    1645 - 1715 Panel Q & A from the afternoon session  Moderator: Ian Millar, MD
    1715 - 1730 Closing/ Course evaluations / Questions  Marc Robins, DO
    Andrew Melnyczenko, CHT


    CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS:

    Accreditation Statement: 
    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Designation Statements: 
    Physician CME: The Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society designates this live course for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Nursing CEU:  This live course is approved for 8 contact hours provided by Florida Board of Registered Nursing/RRT Provider #50-10881

    Licenses Types Approved:

    • Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner
    • Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Licensed Practical Nurse
    • Registered Nurse
    • Certified Nursing Assistant
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Critical Care
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Non-Critical Care
    • Registered Respiratory Therapist
    • Certified Respiratory Therapist

    NBDHMT: This live course is approved for 8 Category ‘A’ credit hours by National Board of Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Technology, 9 Medical Park, Suite 330, Columbia, South Carolina 29203.

    Full Disclosure Statement: All faculty members and planners participating in continuing medical education activities sponsored by Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society are expected to disclose to the participants any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. Full disclosure of faculty and planner relevant financial relationships will be made at the activity.

    UHMS Disclaimer: The information provided at this CME activity is for Continuing Medical Education purposes only.  The lecture content, statements or opinions expressed however, do not necessarily represent those of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS), its affiliates or its employees.

     

  • register now button

    Treatment of Decompression Illness in Recreational Diving: Is reconciliation of different treatment practices necessary? 

    WEDNESDAY, June 26: 8am-5pm
    Program chairs:  Peter Denoble, MD and Jim Chimiak, MD

    SCHEDULE


     

    Standard treatment for decompression illness (DCS) and arterial gas embolism (AGE) both dive-related and iatrogenic, is recompression and hyperbaric oxygen administration. Treatment practices around the world have been mostly derived from the experience of various navies and commercial companies. In the United States, the UHMS provides guidelines based on the U.S. Navy practices with minor adjustments for the recreational diving environment. The mainstay of UHMS recommendations for initial treatment is U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 for serious cases and Treatment Table 5 for mild cases. Both treatment tables apply maximum pressure of 2.8 bars (equivalent to 18 msw or 60 fsw depth). Some medical centers in the United States like Hawaii, NASA and Catalina use greater treatment pressures while others that operate monoplace chambers use less pressure and shorter treatment times. In another part of the world, current practice may differ. In France, treatment tables are derived from the French Navy and COMEX tables, and use nitrox and various pressure levels. COMEX 12 and U.S. Navy Table 9 are examples of short and shallow tables. In Russia, treatment pressure sometimes goes higher than 6 bars. Practitioners in China may follow U.S. practice but they have extensive experience with severe and delayed cases in fish farming. Cairns in Australia has extensive experience in treating cases from the Great Barrier Reef and flying after treatment.

    A decision to recompress in a case when symptoms resolve before admission may vary. Beyond initial treatment, there are major differences in approach to follow-up treatments, auxiliary treatments and physical rehabilitation of injured divers. Additional differences appear in the recommendation for flying after treatment.

    The aim of this workshop is to review variants of current clinical practices, to discuss the rationale for such practices and to consider a need for harmonization of practices.

    Poll: DCI Treatment Principle

    We will invite participants to take the pre-poll after the intro talk. The results will be withheld until after the post-poll is done after all talks.  We have posted the questions in advance below, with hopes that it may motivate more people to register for the pre-course and that attendees may do some homework ahead.  At the end of the lectures, the poll will be repeated with instantaneous show of results and discussion of each topic.

    The questions to try to answer are:

    1. Do all cases of DCI require recompression?
    2. Are protocols shorter and/or shallower than Table 6 acceptable?
    3. Are deeper tables justifiable or necessary?
    4. How does delay to treatment affect decision to treat?
    5. Follow-up treatment: when, how and for how long?
    6. How long does patient need to be observed before discharge?
    7. How long to wait before flying after treatment?

    Poll topics and statements

    1. Normobaric vs. hyperbaric oxygen treatment
      1. Mild DCS cases may be treated with normobaric oxygen only, even when HBO is available
      2. All DCI cases require HBO treatment
      3.  Mild cases that resolve with normobaric oxygen, and are symptom-free for at least six hours, do not need HBO
      4. Serious cases that have completely resolved and have been already symptom-free for 6 hours, may be administered surface oxygen and observed for 24 hours without recompression if there is no recurrence of symptoms.
    2. Short (Comex 12, USN T9, Kindwall) vs. standard (USN T5-T6, and equivalent) treatment protocols
      1. Short tables are not acceptable as initial treatment for DCI
      2. In the case when standard treatment is not available, shorter and/or shallower HBO protocols are acceptable if administered by trained personnel.
    3. Deep tables (deeper than 60 ft)
      1. Deep tables are not justified for any case of DCI
      2. Deep tables are acceptable for DCI in technical diving
      3. Deep tables are acceptable for severe DCI cases with a short delay to treatment
      4. B & C true
    4. Follow up treatment
      1. There is no limit on number or protocol of follow up treatments
      2. In mild cases, one treatment table and up to two follow up standard HBO sessions
      3. In severe cases, two treatment tables, and standard HBO sessions as long as there is a daily improvement
      4. In severe cases, repeat treatment tables until no improvement is achieved
      5. B & C
      6. B & D
    5. Flying after treatment
      1. If symptom-free, wait 24 hours. If with residual symptoms, wait 72 hours
      2. Wait at least 72 hours
      3. Wait for at least a week
    6. Treatment of symptoms recurring during or after FAT
      1. Any symptom during flight even if resolved on landing should be treated with HBO
      2. Only cases with persistent symptoms on landing should be treated
      3. Any symptom occurring within 24 hours after landing should be treated
      4. A & C
      5. B & C

    SCHEDULE 

    Subject to change: posted 1/29/19

    Time

    Lecture

    Faculty

    08:00-08:30

    Current UHMS guidelines

    Nick Bird

    08:30-09:00

    Polling, hidden results: DCI treatment principles (see the list of Q&A in Appendix)

    Petar Denoble

    09:00-09:30

    Current practice in France

    Sébastien de Maistre

    09:30-10:00

    Current practice in China

    Wei-gang Xu

    10:00-10:30

    Coffee Break

     

    10:30-11:00

    Australian experience

    David Wilkinson

    11:00-11:30

    Could normobaric oxygen be accepted as a definitive treatment?

    Richard Moon

    11:30-12:00

    Use of short tables in treatment of DCI

    Brenna Derksen

    12:00-12:30

    Treatment of severe DCS cases

    Ian Grover

    12:30-13:30

    Lunch break

     

    13:30-13:45

    Use of deep tables in US Navy

    David Southerland

    13:45-14:30

    Is it ever too late to treat?

    Jake Freiberger

    14:30-15:00

    Flying after treatment

    Jim Chimiak

    15:00-15:30

    When to return to diving after DCI

    Jake Freiberger

    15:30-15:45

    coffee break

     

    15:45-16:45

    Polling, public results: DCI treatment principles. Discussion of each question. Comparison of pre- and post- answers

    Petar Denoble

    16:45-17:00

    Concluding remarks

    Petar Denoble


    CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS:

    Accreditation Statement: 
    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Designation Statements: 
    The Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society designates this live activity for a maximum of TBA AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Nursing CEU is approved by the Florida Board of Registered Nursing Provider #50-10881. ASM Credit hours 7.5.

    Licenses Types Approved:

    • Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner
    • Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Licensed Practical Nurse
    • Registered Nurse
    • Certified Nursing Assistant
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Critical Care
    • Respiratory Care Practitioner Non-Critical Care
    • Registered Respiratory Therapist
    • Certified Respiratory Therapist


    N
    BDHMT:
     This live activity is approved for TBA Category A credit hours by National Board of Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Technology, 9 Medical Park, Suite 330, Columbia, South Carolina 29203.

    MOC ABPM: This activity has been approved by the American Board of Preventive Medicine for up to TBA MOC credits. Claiming ABPM MOC credit is appropriate for those who are ABPM diplomates.”

    Full Disclosure Statement:
     All faculty members and planners participating in continuing medical education activities sponsored by Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society are expected to disclose to the participants any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. Full disclosure of faculty and planner relevant financial relationships will be made at the activity.UHMS

    Disclaimer: The information provided at this CME activity is for Continuing Medical Education purposes only.  The lecture content, statements or opinions expressed however, do not necessarily represent those of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS), its affiliates or its employees.